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YOUR MUSIC BIZ 101 & MORE RADIO SHOW
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Our big & awesome Music Biz 101 & More radio show (the only FREE advice music business & college radio talk show in the United States) airs every:

WEDNESDAY NIGHT at 8:00.

** Our guest this week is …

Entrepreneur Scooter Braun.

Scooter is also Ariana Grande and Justin Bieber and Tori Kelly’s manager.

And he’s a visionary and a great storyteller.  

Listen to this full show!  It’s longer than our typical hour because this isn’t our typical guest.  

Click HERE to stream the show live!!!!

Tweet Us Your Questions any time (or is it anytime?):

@MusicBiz101wp

Tune your radio to 88.7 FM – WPSC: Brave New Radio.

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Music Biz 101 & More is the only college radio-based FREE advice music & entertainment biz talk show in all of the Americas.  Hosted by William Paterson University professors Dr. Stephen Marcone and David Philp, who are also co-authors of Managing Your Band – 6th Edition, the show airs live most Wednesdays at 8PM EST on WPSC: Brave New Radio.

2 Replies to “Scooter Braun – Ariana Grande/Justin Beiber Manager: This Week’s Radio Show Guest”

  1. Thanks for sharing this. I’m currently working on the f# minor nocturne! they’re beautiful pieces. Afte completion of this, I would go for guitar lessons.
    Don’t get me wrong, you have to be strong and confident to be successful in just about anything you do – but with music, there’s a deeper emotional component to your failures and successes. If you fail a chemistry test, it’s because you either didn’t study enough, or just aren’t that good at chemistry (the latter of which is totally understandable). But if you fail at music, it can say something about your character. It could be because you didn’t practice enough – but, more terrifyingly, it could be because you aren’t resilient enough. Mastering chemistry requires diligence and smarts, but mastering a piano piece requires diligence and smarts, plus creativity, plus the immense capacity to both overcome emotional hurdles, and, simultaneously, to use that emotional component to bring the music alive.
    Before I started taking piano, I had always imagined the Conservatory students to have it so good – I mean, for their homework, they get to play guitar, or jam on their saxophone, or sing songs! What fun! Compared to sitting in lab for four hours studying the optical properties of minerals, or discussing Lucretian theories of democracy and politics, I would play piano any day.

    But after almost three years of piano at Orpheus Academy, I understand just how naïve this is. Playing music for credit is not “easy” or “fun” or “magical” or “lucky.” Mostly, it’s really freakin’ hard. It requires you to pick apart your piece, play every little segment over and over, dissect it, tinker with it, cry over it, feel completely lame about it, then get over yourself and start practicing again. You have to be precise and diligent, creative and robotic. And then – after all of this – you have to re-discover the emotional beauty in the piece, and use it in your performance.

    1. Thanks for the comment. I wonder if a chemist or scientist would argue that they require creativity too. For example, if I’m working on a cancer treatment and I keep hitting a dead end with what I’m trying, does it take creativity to figure out why I’m not getting the results I want and then create an end-around so I can give it another go?

      Maybe that’s just the scientific method. Or maybe songwriters should use the scientific method more often.

      Of course, I’m no scientist so may just be completely wrong. Bottom line – music is really, really hard. But when you succeed, the feeling is unmatched.

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